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Raincouver

Rain Catchment Systems

Yes, it rains in Vancouver. A lot. But besides it being a default conversation starter, a reason to complain on Facebook, or perhaps even population control for our small city, some prefer to be resourceful and capitalize on the use of rain catchment systems. Also known as rain harvesting, it is the accumulation and deposition of rainwater for reuse before it reaches the aquifer.

While most of us over here in Vancouver prefer to balk at the rain’s usefulness, Bermuda, an island in the Atlantic Ocean north of the Caribbean, relies on it as a potable water supply source. The roofs on Bermuda homes have wedge-shaped limestone glides that divert rain water through vertical leaders and into storage tanks.

Besides using the water for drinking or bathing, other uses for rainwater collection include water for your garden, livestock, irrigation, and indoor heating of houses. Rainwater is substantially free of salinity and other salts, making it a viable potable water source.

Here are 4 houses around West Vancouver that use water catchment systems:

2860 Mathers Avenue

This 6 bedroom 7 bathroom luxury estate in Altamont, West Vancouver sits on a 0.9 acre gated lot with almost 12,000 square feet of living space. It has radiant floor heating throughout, solar panels for hot water, heated driveway, and a rainwater reclamation system.

26 Passage Island

An eco friendly home with south and west facing ocean views, this 2 bedroom 2 bathroom island home comes with solar panels, waterfront crane, cable lift/gondola, large patios and decks, and rain catchment system.

41 Passage Island

41 Passage Island sits on a 17,000 square foot lot with 65 feet of waterfront frontage. The rustic cabin includes low bank access to water, incredible views, and a water catchment system.

19 Passage Island

Lot 19 Passage Island is a 2 bedroom 2 bathroom home, set in a mature forest offering oceanfront views of local mountains and mainland. It’s an eco-friendly, self-sufficient house with easy waterfront access, solar power, decks, and rain catchment system.

By Adam Naamani

Real estate specialist, software engineer, and writer based in Vancouver, British Columbia.

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